Rwanda tackles antimicrobial resistance through a pharmacy led campaign

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Rwanda

AMR is a growing global issue and internationally much AMR research and innovative work goes on. Following the success of the Innovative pharmacy solution to antimicrobial resistance in the UK by the Information Design and Architecture combating drug resistant infection (IDAPPS) project at University of Reading, there was an opportunity to explore how this approach could be taken to an international community.

A collaboration between the University of Reading, the University of Rwanda, the Rwanda Community Pharmacists Union (RCPU), the Commonwealth Pharmacists Association (CPA), Design Science and Isomeric was formed to explore how a design led approach to develop a campaign would change behaviours and attitudes towards AMR in Rwanda.

Pharmacy and health care access in Rwandan

Several workshops in Kigali Rwanda were held to better understand how just over 800 registered pharmacists serve a population of approximately 12.5million and dispense AMR advice. The broader insights of how doctors and community health workers support the community was imperative to ensure any campaign woudl bridge the gap and provide continuity of health care. The project team included designers, behavioural change consultants and pharmacists.

Workshops in Rwanda

The workshops were designed to engage with pharmacist, pharmacy users and other stakeholders. New models that fuelled creativity were introduced at the workshops led by designers and pharmacists. The co-design workshops were practical and interactive and the team came away with many ideas to progress within the context and constraints that were discussed.

Pilot study and pharmacist training

Initial pharmacy materials and a training plan were implemented, during this first phase, across several pharmacies reaching different populations.

Training pharmacists on the campaign materials

The next phase…

Following the success of the pilot phase the project team are developing the materials for a bigger launch reaching a wider population.
Analysis of pilot data, other research in Rwanda and a final workshop in the UK has led to more collaborations and new ideas.